Why The VFX Work Of Coco Is News Now?

Coco is an upcoming 2017 American computer-animated musical film produced by Pixar Animation Studios and released by Walt Disney Pictures. Based on an original idea by Lee Unkrich, it is being directed by Unkrich, and co-directed and written by Adrian Molina. It is scheduled to be released on November 22, 2017. The Pixar team made several trips to Mexico to help define the characters and story of Coco.

More than 21,000 people signed a petition on Change.org stating that the trademark was “cultural appropriation and exploitation at its worst.” A week later, Disney cancelled its attempt, with the official statement saying that the “trademark filing was intended to protect any title for our film and related activities. It has since been determined that the title of the film will change, and therefore we are withdrawing our trademark filing. These events kept the film very much in news.

Movies, always the realm of fantasy, are now further removed from reality than ever. Pixar has been fairly quiet about their upcoming film Coco. The film was first announced way back in 2012 as an untitled picture about Dia de los Muertos, and in the years since, we really only learned that it would be directed by Toy Story 3 helmer Lee Unkrich and that the movie was entitled “Coco”. Granted, it takes a long time for these movies to move through development, but the studio has been surprisingly quiet on their sole non-sequel.

Also, if you’re worried that Pixar is just co-opting Mexican culture to make a quick buck, fear not. The studio invested in heavily to make sure that they were respectful and inclusive according to Vanity Fair. While we’re still a ways off from Coco, and we’ll have to get through Cars 3 to get there, for me, it’s the most exciting film Pixar is working on right now because it’s not a sequel. I’m curious about Toy Story 4 and The Incredibles 2, but Coco promises to give audiences something new from the studio, and I can’t wait to see what it is.

The VFX of this film has been equally controversial as the other production stuff. A number of visual effects courses are going to include the visual effects work of this film into their curriculum.

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